A year already?!

 

 

close up photography of pink birthday cake
Photo by Mohammad Danish on Pexels.com

Wow! A year of blogging snuck up on me, and slinked by without my noticing. How crazy is that!

 

just a few birthday themed knits:

Birthday cake hat by Susan B. Anderson, Happy Birthday mitts by Anna Lipinska and the sweet crocheted First Birthday Crown by Crochet for Laika…

My first post was about how I came back to knitting, my favourite (so far) was researching and making connections between the Michelle Obama portrait and crafting.

This year, it seems I’ve done quite a bit of knitting and thinking about knitting, colour, yarn, and fashion… Oh, I’ve just finished up my twisted stirrup socks in time for autumn. Now, I just have to decide which of my WiPs to finish up next…

 

 

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Summer Reading

macro photography of black sunglasses on sand
Photo by Ylanite Koppens on Pexels.com

My kids absolutely hate the thought of doing anything remotely school-related during the summer. And that includes reading anything that could possibly be edifying or remotely educating in any way. I, on the other hand, like to stock up on books throughout the year so that I have something nearby to read, when the days get too sticky and muggy for me to even contemplate taking up a knitting needle.

Here are a few books (fiction and non-fiction), that I’ve read in summers past, that I can recommend, and what’s on my ‘reading now’ part of the bookshelf… What are you reading this summer?

Books to Change how we see People
Ursula K. LeGuin’s The Left Hand of Darkness. The reading of this taught me that gender does not have anything to do with love, friendship and heroism.
Predictably Irrational by Dan Ariely. Fascinating what behavioral scientists learn about us humans.
Going, Went, Gone by Jenny Erpenbeck. Recently translated German bestseller about Germany’s attempt to come to grips with what immigration really means.

Books to Change how we see the world around us
The Hidden Life of Trees by Peter Wohlleben. Another translated bestseller written by a forester about how trees grow, form friendships, raise their kids and have a different sense of time than we do.
The Swarm: A Novel by Frank Schätzing. Packed with research and action, bringing science fiction and environmentalism together. I would love this to be filmed.

On My Bookshelf
Limit by Frank Schatzing. My son gave this to me as a gift, and it’s a bit of a doorstop.
Book of Knitting Patterns by Mary Thomas – I jump backwards and forwards trying to envision these timeless patterns in modern yarns living in my stash at the moment.
Salt, Fat, Acid, Heat by Samin  Nosrat. Because it’s lovely to laze somewhere in the shade and read about food and look at the gorgeous illustrations.

 

 

Other reading lists:

Guardian reading list

TED’s summer reading list

Chaos, Gardens and Knitting

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I finally got around to seeing This Beautiful Fantastic week, and it‘s got me thinking about Gardens and chaos.

As I wrote earlier, the german title pretty much gave away the idea that they were trying to make an Amelie film, but I was looking forward to the knitwear. Which was a bit of a letdown, but I started thinking about why people love gardening, gardens, and what the film has tried to say about life.

Bella is an orphan, who was abandoned in a box in a park. That would make anyone anxious, I‘d imagine. Bella attempts to control her life by imposing extreme order on every aspect of her life. She doesn‘t want to let in any chaos, which brings us to gardens. Nature can be chaotic, unpredictable and well, wild. That‘s why humans developed order and culture to tame Nature in its various forms: none more lovely than the garden.

A garden is the creation of order from chaos. It’s the creation of a little paradise, or eden. A refuge from the wild or hectic hustle and bustle of daily life. A chance to centre oneself and reconnect with nature and one‘s self. In fact, it is only when Bella is able to reconnect with Nature through her garden, that she is able to connect with her own creativity and attain her goals of becoming a writer, making friends, finding love and overcoming that anxiety.

Although the garden shots were lovely (although whose point of view were the out of focus flowers supposed to represent?), there were too many references (the story in the story brought ‚The Little Prince’ to mind) to other works for this to shine on its own merits. It was predictable, but that can be comforting at times. If you want a little more excitement, look into how many instances of twinning or doubling you can spot throughout the film.

From gardening, it‘s a short jump back to crafting and knitting, because it‘s all about taking that „chaos“ or undefined potential and making something out of it. And that’s why I love knitting.

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Andrew Scott (aka Moriarty from the „Sherlock“ series) in This Beautiful Fantastic

 

 

 

Diversity in German fashion

Fran Summers Vogue Germany 072018

I ran into this Vogue cover today, and of course had to take it home. Not just because it is simply stunning, but also because it is actually quite rare for a black model to get the cover of Vogue Germany. While Vogue in the US and the UK are considered quite groundbreaking in pursuing diversity in Fashion, Vogue Germany hasn’t so much.

After a bit of digging, I found out how rare this is, and yet, there’s still a ways to go.

A Brief History of Diversity of Vogue Germany Covers

Vogue Germany existed briefly toward the end of the Weimar Republic (1929-1930). It came back to Germany in 1979, following the brand’s acquisition by Conde Nast and the following worldwide expansion. The German language edition serves German-speaking Europe: Germany, Austria and Switzerland.

Iman (above, left) was the first black model to grace the cover in June 1982. Of the fifteen times a black model has been on the cover (alone, in a collage or a group of models), Naomi Campbell (middle) is the clear winner, with 5 covers to her name. Special mention to Jamaican model Lois Samuels (right), because although she appeared with a group of models, she actually indirectly influenced the Cover title!

Every few years or so, Vogue Germany will have a black model on their cover. After Iman, came Jennifer Beals, Beverly Peele, Naomi Campbell, Lois Samuels, Kiara Kabukuru, Alek Wek (though sadly inside the fold), Arlenis Sosa, Lais Ribeiro, Liya Kebede, Yasmin Wijnaldum and now Nigerian Mayowa Nicholas. The first asian cover model was Ling Tan (November 1998). Not a lot, still nothing to sneeze at.

I’m hoping future covers of Vogue Germany will show how diverse German society has become in the last few years…

 

photosource: Condé Nast/ vogue.de

Is the future of knitting green?

woman wearing yellow knit sweater and blue knit hat
Photo by Thomas Chauke on Pexels.com

Have you seen the Guardian‘s article about the sustainable future of fashion? What practical developments are we likely to see in the knitting world in the near future?

Lucy Siegel lists among other things that new fibres will enter the market. Natural colours and dyes are on the upswing, recommerce and reusing will be more common, development of self-mending fibres, and garments made of organic materials will be treated like heirlooms.

Knitters are already doing many of these things. I for one, am looking forward to trying  out pineapple fibre!

Knit summer headbands

Marinella from ‘ I love green’ posted recently about summer headbands, and I think that’s a fabulous idea.

 

Headband with Bow by creativeyarn (top right), Moebius headband and the cute Wrap and tie headband both by Jenise Hope.

Not only are they quick knits, but knit in team colours, they would be great for sporting events as well. In case you need to celebrate a victory or crush to soothe bitter defeat.

Trade show overload

Nadelwelt

My knitting friend and I thought we would pop in to Nadelwelt in Karlsruhe, have a quick look and get home in time for lunch. I don’t know why we thought that would be possible. We’re still young. That’s the only excuse I’m prepared to give.

If you’re ever in the area (next year the show falls on May 3-5, 2019) and find you have a full day to spare, definitely check out Nadelwelt. The trade show is held in the same place that the ARTkarlsruhe is held, and it’s just massive. My eyes have been opened to how the needlecrafts have taken off in Germany (despite you not seeing a lot of people knitting, crocheting or otherwise crafting in public here).

There was a distinct focus on quilting, with a quilted art exhibition right out front. We had a lovely chat with two British textile artists Cas Holmes and Gillian Travis, who apparently travel around to exhibit and sell at textile shows and fairs all around Europe.

Cas Holmes treats paper, thread and fabric like paints, and her work has the ethereal quality of memories half forgotten, floating out of the subconscious.

Gillian Travis, on the other hand, makes vibrant, graphic quilts which reflect her travels and other sources of inspiration, and just whisks the viewer away as if on a magic carpet. She has an amazing eye for colour, and a wicked sense of humour. I had a great time talking to her.

Although we were overwhelmed by the sheer size of the show (from fabrics, buttons, yarns, sewing machines of all types, etc), we did make a lovely find: our nearest LYS shut down late last year, and now we’ve found a new one. The owner happened to be on hand and she and one of her staff gave us a mini-workshop on Tunisian Crochet.

So while I am not quite in the mood to knit at the moment, I’ve been practising my tunisian crochet and staring at my boot socks, hoping that they’ll have the decency to finish themselves up without me. Thankfully I did them two at a time (each on two DPNs) so each only has about an inch of ribbing left.

 

 

On the road

About a month ago, I went off with friends on a mystery weekend, and ended up in Bonn (friends willing to plan mystery weekends, and go along on mystery weekends are the best sort, in my opinion!). We went a gorgeous bike tour of the city, and eventually ended up at the University of Bonn’s Arithmeum. Museum of the history of calculating.

We had a great guide, who explained how complicated it had been to create a working adding machine, that would carry all the digits. It used to be complicated work.

These days we can whip out our phones and calculate what 15% off on those fabulous knitting needles will mean to our budgets.

As luck would have it, the Arithmeum (attached to the University Math Department) also had an art exhibit from their works inspired by discrete mathematics.

Absolutely gorgeous. Speaks to the knitter in me. Very much intarsia or mosaic-knitting…

Mode in Germany

This is an old interview (from 2013) of Women’s Wear Daily’s Berlin Correspondant Melissa Drier on Deutsche Welle. Although what she is wearing in the screen-shot is made in Germany, Drier is a New Yorker. She talks about moving to Berlin in the 1980s, experiencing the Fall of the Wall, The East-West rivalry, and the fashion scene in the German capital and the promising environment giving rise to up and coming designers.

She also talks about Berlin Fashion Week, and the Bread and Butter trade show. Not much has changed since then (the most notable thing is that Mercedes is no longer the major sponsor), and there is a growing niche in sustainable fashion, as an offshoot of the Green Week trade show.

Germany still hasn’t become a fashion capital in the five years since this interview, but it’s still an interesting place to be fashion-wise…

Heavenly knits

My last post ran a Little Long, so I decided to split it, and compile the knits I felt related to the Met Gala theme, “Heavenly Bodies: Fashion and the catholic Imagination.”

 

photo source: Ravelry.com

Above is Audry Nicklin’s fabulous and accurate star map Celestarium Shawl, second row from left Ryan Hollist’s crocheted Sun Burst Shawl, Starry Nights by Sam Godden and Stephen West’s Outer Space.

And Outer Space got me thinking about space travel and then I ran into this

 

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Space Helmet by Shiri Mor

 

Space Helmet by Shiri Mor on the cover of knit.1 back in 2007 (No, really!)

And made me think of something I saw a week or two ago. Balaclavas.

 

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Fall 2018 Gucci / Vogue.com

 

Vogue and the The Guardian are saying that we’re going to be wearing balaclavas this coming winter. Really?