A year already?!

 

 

close up photography of pink birthday cake
Photo by Mohammad Danish on Pexels.com

Wow! A year of blogging snuck up on me, and slinked by without my noticing. How crazy is that!

 

just a few birthday themed knits:

Birthday cake hat by Susan B. Anderson, Happy Birthday mitts by Anna Lipinska and the sweet crocheted First Birthday Crown by Crochet for Laika…

My first post was about how I came back to knitting, my favourite (so far) was researching and making connections between the Michelle Obama portrait and crafting.

This year, it seems I’ve done quite a bit of knitting and thinking about knitting, colour, yarn, and fashion… Oh, I’ve just finished up my twisted stirrup socks in time for autumn. Now, I just have to decide which of my WiPs to finish up next…

 

 

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Trade show overload

Nadelwelt

My knitting friend and I thought we would pop in to Nadelwelt in Karlsruhe, have a quick look and get home in time for lunch. I don’t know why we thought that would be possible. We’re still young. That’s the only excuse I’m prepared to give.

If you’re ever in the area (next year the show falls on May 3-5, 2019) and find you have a full day to spare, definitely check out Nadelwelt. The trade show is held in the same place that the ARTkarlsruhe is held, and it’s just massive. My eyes have been opened to how the needlecrafts have taken off in Germany (despite you not seeing a lot of people knitting, crocheting or otherwise crafting in public here).

There was a distinct focus on quilting, with a quilted art exhibition right out front. We had a lovely chat with two British textile artists Cas Holmes and Gillian Travis, who apparently travel around to exhibit and sell at textile shows and fairs all around Europe.

Cas Holmes treats paper, thread and fabric like paints, and her work has the ethereal quality of memories half forgotten, floating out of the subconscious.

Gillian Travis, on the other hand, makes vibrant, graphic quilts which reflect her travels and other sources of inspiration, and just whisks the viewer away as if on a magic carpet. She has an amazing eye for colour, and a wicked sense of humour. I had a great time talking to her.

Although we were overwhelmed by the sheer size of the show (from fabrics, buttons, yarns, sewing machines of all types, etc), we did make a lovely find: our nearest LYS shut down late last year, and now we’ve found a new one. The owner happened to be on hand and she and one of her staff gave us a mini-workshop on Tunisian Crochet.

So while I am not quite in the mood to knit at the moment, I’ve been practising my tunisian crochet and staring at my boot socks, hoping that they’ll have the decency to finish themselves up without me. Thankfully I did them two at a time (each on two DPNs) so each only has about an inch of ribbing left.

 

 

On the road

About a month ago, I went off with friends on a mystery weekend, and ended up in Bonn (friends willing to plan mystery weekends, and go along on mystery weekends are the best sort, in my opinion!). We went a gorgeous bike tour of the city, and eventually ended up at the University of Bonn’s Arithmeum. Museum of the history of calculating.

We had a great guide, who explained how complicated it had been to create a working adding machine, that would carry all the digits. It used to be complicated work.

These days we can whip out our phones and calculate what 15% off on those fabulous knitting needles will mean to our budgets.

As luck would have it, the Arithmeum (attached to the University Math Department) also had an art exhibit from their works inspired by discrete mathematics.

Absolutely gorgeous. Speaks to the knitter in me. Very much intarsia or mosaic-knitting…

Authentic Spring

I’ve been away for a minute, because spring. In Germany, spring doesn’t just mean Easter and half-term Holidays, it means nature is waking up, and of Course working in the garden. Now I know, the British are known for simply fabulous gardens, but so are many Germans. They love a beautiful garden (of whatever size – from balcony to tea-towel size and bigger), to provide a lovely island of tranquility.

Spring is also the start of the beekeeper year, and I’ve been away for a while, getting my hives sorted. I’m doing a beekeepers course, so I thought I’d drop some bee-themed knits:

(Beeswax Hat by Amy van der Laar,  Covered in Bees shawl by Doggerell Designs and the crocheted Bee Hotel shawl by Christina Hadderingh / Fotos: Ravelry.com)

While I’ve been away, I’ve been watching fashion historian Amanda Hallay’s The Ultimate Fashion History on Youtube when I’ve been too tired to knit. She goes all the way from Prehistoric fashion to the present day, looking at History, Art, and politics and how fashion responded to the life of the times (Her favourite Quote is “Fashion is not an Island, it’s a Response”).

via Daily Prompt: Authentic

Design Moodboard

 

initiateknitdesign_2018
My Pinterest moodboard for the Knit Design Challenge

 

This is my moodboard for the InitiateKnitDesign Challenge run by Francoise of Aroha Knits every year.

I popped over to Barcelona for a girly Weekend with two girlfriends and it gave me quite an emotional boost in the midwinter. Running on the beachfront Promenade, enjoying the sunshine, having Tapas, Cocktails and laughing just hit the spot.

We booked an audioguide tour to visit the Sagrada Familia Basilica (unless you’re in a travel group that takes care of everything, definitely book online beforehand. Apparently no one just Shows up and expects to get in anywhere anymore). I highly recommend going in the morning/mid-morning, so that you catch the sunlight coming through the Windows.

I was particularly taken with the tree-like columns within the Basilica. It felt like walking through a forest (but of stone), with the light streaming through the various windows in a fairly similar way to how light is filtered down to the forest floor.

I’m not sure yet what the final form will me: cowl, scarf, shawl or shrug, but that’s the start of an idea.

 

Woolfest haul

 

There were about 26 vendors at Wollandia, but it seemed like more.

Even though sock yarn (ie fingering weight) is extremely popular here in Germany, I now get the feeling that the new trend (on top of Hand dyed and naturally dyed yarns) is socks with glitter?

I told Sandra from Farbenpracht, that you just can’t have enough glitter in your life. There is no way I would want to hide that in shoes! She even suggested the lovely Moonrise shawl pattern from Olga Buraya-Kefelian.

I found my Ultraviolet (every time I look at these skeins, I feel it in my Ajna!): The skeins from Filzlinge were by far and away the most Vibrant colours on Show. I realized that the yarns are single handspun, but the colours are so gorgeous, I figured that the Internet would teach me how to make it work: Charles at Knitmuch’s tips for knitting with fuzzy yarn.

 

Honourable Mention:

Lütt Wollhus on Facebook

How to visit a woolfest

 

So, I went to my first fibre Festival this Weekend: Wollandia. And it was awesome. It was an intimate (less than 100 exhibitors) gathering of independent dyers, Spinners and purveyors of other sheep-related goodness.  It was Wollandia’s first time too, so we had that in common! The organizer Erica Carnevale did an amazing job.

 

If this is going to be a yearly event, then I can definitely recommend stopping by if you’re in the Pforzheim area (any good sat-nav will get you there). There were independent dyers (whose names I only know from Ravelry and browsing Etsy or its German pendant Dawanda). And of course it’s great to be able to take the yarn into your hands before buying.

Tips for visiting yarn festivals:

  • Wear layers
  • Wear walking shoes
  • Take a friend – or make friends there -complimenting dyers’ work, collecting cards and having a chat always goes down a treat.
  • Beforehand – look at the exhibitor list and develop a strategy.
    • Do a full circle and have a good look at everything before starting to buy. Unless you plan to visit a specific vendor.
    • plan for emergencies: Enough cash on hand? the location of the next closest cash machine may be good to know.
    • have a plan for how to actually use those speckled or otherwise multicoloured skeins of yarn. (Skeinyarn’s tips on knitting with variegated yarns; Dana at Yards of Happiness is my inspiration to get more colour in my knitting life)
    • What’s the minimum amount of yarn that I should purchase? if I don’t have a project in mind?
  • Have a budget – look up what things cost in real life, so that you can recognize a deal on equipment if you see one.
  • Plan some breaks: At German events like this, there is ALWAYS food – cakes, waffles, sandwiches, even Flammkuchen.

Interweave’s Tips on how to shop at Yarn and Wool festivals.

Winter impressions

This weekend, we took a short drive into the Black Forest, to go walking in the snow. Below a certain point, we just haven’t had much snow to call it a proper winter this year. My neighbours’ buttercups are blooming! At around 1100m above sea-level, it was cold enough for me to try putting my fingerless gloves OVER my gloves. That worked a treat.

Sometimes it gets so cold, foggy, and windy that any cabin serving hot coffee, cocoa and cake (bottom letft) is a treat. No matter how run down!

Scifi and Avantgarde fashion

Comme des Garcons ss2018
Rei Kawakubo / Comme des Garcons SS2018

Looking at the work of Avantgarde Designers like Rei Kawakubo is a little bit like reading a science fiction book in one gulp. It’s not the same Thing as looking up what trend forecasters are saying or projecting for the next Season (or several Seasons in advance) – although that can be fun too.

My Book Club is looking at science fiction novels, and I had the distinct pleasure of reading prolific author Ray Bradbury’s ‘There will come Soft Rains‘ from “The Martian Chronicles” at our Christmas Party. It’s amazing how stories published in 1950s are still relevant and gripping today.

This month, we’re moving on from “Blade Runner” to Cixin Liu’s “The Three Body Problem.” It’s a challenge, to choose books for people who know nothing about science fiction and claim not to be interested in anything ‘Star Warsy’ (even though Star Wars is turning out to be more space opera/space fantasy than scifi, and that’s ok too).

Just as in science fiction, avantgarde fashion asks us ‘What if?’ In her Spring Summer Pret à Porter collection, I think Kawakubo is posing the question of what it would look like if we were to seriously recycle what we have, now that we are at peak stuff? Through the lense of clothes? One answer may very well be a profuse collage of textiles, colours and prints.

Which leads me to ask myself: what would it look like through the lense of knitting?

Hurricane knitting

ICE Train in station
Waiting for the Train / Source: Pexel stock photos

 

When instead of having your Train arrive, what you’re looking at is

 

Because trains and planes have been cancelled all over Europe because of Hurricane Friederike, knitting or crocheting can help pass the time and ease the pain.

Photo source: Ravelry

Friederike Shawl by Monika Eckert and Longing for Spring Socks by Friederike Erbslein and Frederique by Elsebeth Lavold

 

Safe travels, my friends.