Long live stripes

I thought for sure, that stripes were over. I was pretty sure that stripes would settle back down in that corner where classics go to have a cocktail and catch their breaths, while Polka dots would have their Moment in the limelight. But there’s a saying in German:

“Totgesagte leben länger”

which basically means that there’s life in the old dog yet. And that means that I’m seeing those spots, alongside and stripes. But stripes of a different ilk.

Source: Vogue.com

Which makes me think of

Source: Ravelry.com

The Albers Pullover by Julia Farwell-Clay; Mitred Magic by Amy Polcyn; Liz Cardigan by Jesse Mozlan (a sweet pattern that’s currently free on Ravelry); and Bristol Ivy’s Arbus from her new book ‘Knitting Outside the Box.’

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Spring/ Summer knitting

daniela gregis striped pullover 222018
Daniela Gregis ss2018 striped Pullover

 

Have you started your knitting for spring/ summer yet? Or are you still gathering Inspiration like me?

So far, the dominant trends seem to be pastels, especially lavender, brights and rainbows on the colour front.

Patterns: stripes, polka dots and florals. Silhouettes: easy-going forms alternate with statement sleeves.

photo source: Vogue.com

 

We still have a bit of time to flip through the glossies before we make up our minds and head out to the LYS.

Glamour Feb 2018 Tracee Ellis Ross in Jil Sander
Tracee Ellis Ross on the cover of February 2018 Glamour

Here’s how the Jil Sander two-piece looks on a real Person (well, although Tracee Ellis Ross is built like an amazon… Interesting that it’s styled with Jeans. Wouldn’t that be way too hot for summer?)

 

via Daily Prompt: Dominant

Newsstand Review: Brigitte

brigitte

It’s on my to-do list every year, to have a look in at the Brigitte magazine’s Knit Feature in autumn. This year it’s quite lovely. Twenty-one very wearable and very knittable designs styled with designer (and non-designer clothing).

fotosource: Brigitte magazine

These are my absolute favourites (including the rainbow pullover on the cover). Oversized pieces, relaxed silhouettes, drop shoulders, snuggly hygge-inspired. And yet each piece has a little something to make it extra special – yarn embroidery, colour-blocking, ends left hanging as tassels, contrast colour edgings.
It’s shaping up to be a very snuggly (the German word is kuschelig)  knit-season this year.

Knit Autumn’s Trends 5: 3Rs

So, I was minding my own business, watching listening to youtube while knitting. When I ran into a little extra from The Knit Show: Knitting and Crochet Trends from Vogue Knitting.

So, those three Rs are Ribs, Ruffles and Ruanas.

Ribs

Fotosource: Ravelry

Are ribs ever not in? I think it’s very much about texture and structure. Solène Le Roux, a designer out of Hong Kong, has some very classic pieces (Rib and Garter Stitch Shawl right, and Ribbed Raglan Sweater top left), while Meghan Fernandes’ contribution to the Slow Knitting book, Spruce features ribbing in cozy cowl form.
In fact, the more I think about it, the more I want to include my Sheep Sorrel in as a rib (because panels are also about texture and structure).

 

Ruffles
Now, I’ve been seeing ruffles for quite a while now, so I will not ask if we have reached ‘peak ruffle.’ If you like ruffles (I love ruffles, and am finally thrilled to have learned how to knit them), then I say knit ruffles.

Fotosource: Ravelry

I see ruffles on garments (like Ankestrick’s Organic) and Shawls (like Kathy Elkin’s Northfield Gradient Shawl), but new this year on sleeves. Statement sleeves (like Amy Herzog’s Flutter Pullover and Zoe Scheffy’s  Ruffle Sleeve Pullover).

 

Ruanas

 

Fotosource Ravelry

And lastly, I was disappointed to find that there aren’t a lot of clear definitions on the interwebs about what exactly a Ruana is. So, I’ve done a bit of research for us, my dear readers.

A poncho is more or less a square or rectangular shaped outer garment, with a slit/hole in the middle where the head slips through. They can be knit on the bias (with a point in front), or straight (often referred to as a serape). In contrast, a ruana looks like a T or a Y when lain flat. Deidre at BiddyMurphy says that ruanas come from the Andes region of Venezuela, and the word originally meant ‘Lord of Blankets.’ They may or may not have a hood attached, but tend to generally be longer than a poncho.

Above: Santa Fe Ruana by Judith Shangold, Striped Ruana by Kaffe Fasset, a more modern design Wrap it Up Ruana by Lidia Karabinech.