Knitting BLM

Michelle Bernard/ GetKnitfacedinCo  source: Ravelry.com

 

I think it’s all been said by now. But I like Michelle Bernard‘s BLM Dishcloth because it invites us even in mundane moments to remember what the movement stands for.

Books better than „White Fragility“:

If you want the facts, take a moment to read „White Rage“ by Dr Carol Anderson, a history professor who looks at the development of a system intent on keeping certain people in their place. She explains what she means in this video.

Richard Rothstein‘s „The Color of Law“ is also eye opening. Here‘s a short talk he gave about the myth of segregation in the US. 

And Jane Elliot‘s „A Collar in my pocket- the blue eyes brown eyes exercise“ or the documentary about her work called „A Class Divided.“ There are several things interesting about her exercise:
a) how quickly adults (even though the exercise was developed to be used for young children) seem to believe preposterous statements once they are based on science.

b) how quickly people will accept a status quo, especially if they are on the comfortable side.

c) how distressed participation made people and how they refuse to make the analogy to current events. Here is the exercise taking place on the Oprah Show

d) how the language Ms. Elliott used is eerily similar to the language politicians have used to and about the Black Community or the Civil Rights movement.

I think instead of trying to convince people that they are racist, often against their will, we should be telling them what they can do to change the system: helping people get registered to vote, and contacting local and state government representatives to stop redlining in housing policy and voter suppression.